DDA and SOURCES OF INFORMATION

DDA GUIDE NOTES.

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The DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT

The Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) has been incorporated ito the Equality Act. This now covers far more than disability. The original DDA had guidance documents published in connection with it and these considerably helped with understanding it. For this reason, the DDA is still referred to in this web site as it focusses on the disability aspects of equality.

The 1995 Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) came into force in December 1996. Many employers and service providers have taken action and removed practices and facilities which could discriminate against people with disabilities. Some have brought in new practices and procedures and provided auxilliary equipment as required by October 1999 in stage III of the Act. Physical barriers should have been removed by the deadline of October 2004.

However, plenty of others will not have done all of this or, in some cases, any of it. The Disability Rights Commission came into being in April 2000 and the signs were that the requirements and actions taken under the DDA were becoming more stringent. The DRC is now the Equality and Human Rights Commission (www.equalityhumanrights.com.en)

The DDA 2005 placed additional duties on statutory bodies, including local authorities, health services and the police. It also reduced the exemptions for private clubs and increased the expectations on housing service providers.

The question of what to do to be within the act was difficult because precise actions were not set down. A code of practice on actions to consider was issued in October 1999 and this has been updated to include what should be done to remove physical barriers.

The basic requirement is
NOT TO DISCRIMINATE AGAINST PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES,
particularly when providing services.

Many of the actions that can help in this are comparatively easy to undertake and do not necessarily need to cost a lot. Common sense, practical action and some understanding of the factors of disability will carry a designer, developer or service provider a long way towards providing an equal service for disabled people. This is still the case under the Equality Act.

ACCESS STATEMENTS

These are written statements that explain how a developer, building or service provider intends to provide an 'inclusive' facility that will give access to everyone, particularly including people with disabilities. They may show how guidance and regulations are being followed or give alternative methods of achieving the same results. The statements are often produced by Access Consultants. They may be required by Planning and Building Regulation authorities.



DDA GUIDANCE NOTES

The best indications of what to work towards the built environment are in are in the British Standard BS:8300 and Part M of the Building Regulations. Items that were to the standard of Part M at the time they were provided are counted as being acceptable for ten years from the date that they were installed.

The British Standard (BS:8300) on access to buildings for disabled people was issued in 2002 and is regularly updated in the light of experience or more research. This British Standard tends to become the basis for the Building Regulations as they are updated.

BS:8300 and Part M standards should be used for all current work. Other guidance is available such as design information published by the Centre for Accessible Environments, The Royal National Institute for the Blind (RNIB), the Royal National Institute for the Deaf (RNID), the Department of Transport and the Fieldfare Trust (for countryside and open spaces) .

access2go provides a set of guidance notes to help service and facility providers in their initial steps towards complying with the DDA. All these web pages are designed so that they can easily be printed off and distributed if needed.

CLICK HERE TO SEE THE GUIDE NOTES..

The information in this web site is provided as a free service by a retired disability access consultant. A limited response service is available by sending an email to martin.affleck@ntlworld.com

Please put access2go in the subject heading to the email so that it isn't counted as spam.

SOURCES OF INFORMATION

THE CENTRE FOR ACCESSIBLE ENVIRONMENTS

Provider of technical information, training and consultancy in making the environment accessible.

20-21, Holyer House,
Red Lion Court,
LONDON,
EC4A 3EB.
Tel: 020 7822 8232
email: info@cae.org.uk
web site: http://www.cae.org.uk

Publications include:

DESIGNING FOR ACCESSIBILITY.

ACCESS AUDITS.
This includes Designing for Accessibility, plus audit guidance and check lists.

ACCESS TO ATMS (Automatic Teller Machines)
Contains useful areas of reach and vision charts.

PART M of the BUILDING REGULATIONS

Published by The NBS (part of RIBA Enterprises Ltd) and available from:
(Mail, Telephone and Fax Orders only),
The Old Post Office,
St. Nicholas Street,
NEWCASTLE UPON TYNE,
NE1 1RH.
Telephone: 0191 244 5557

BRITISH STANDARD BS:8300

Published by the British Standards Institute.

Telephone: 0345 086 9001
Web site: www.bsigroup.com

The ACCESS ASSOCIATION

Organisation of access professionals, particularly local government access officers and access consultants.

Web Site: www.accessassociation.co.uk

THE EQUALITY AND HUMAN RIGHTS COMMISSION

Provider of information on the Equality Act, including the Codes of Practice and advice on individual situations.

Website: www.equalityhumanrights.com/en

NATIONAL REGISTER of ACCESS CONSULTANTS

A national register to ensure access consultants and auditors are of a professional quality. They have a list of auditors and consultants who are qualified and able to provide services

National Register of Access Consultants
The Construction Industry Council,
2nd Floor,
The Building Centre,
26, Store Street,
LONDON,
WC1E 7BT.
Tel: 020 7399 7417
email: info@nrac.org.uk
web site: http://www.nrac.org.uk

ROYAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE BLIND (RNIB)

Provides consultancy on vision issues.

Telephone: 0303 123 999
Website: www.rnib.org.uk

ROYAL NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF (RNID)

Provides consultancy on hearing issues.

Now trading arm is Action For Hearing Loss

1-3, Highbury Station Road,
LONDON N! 1SE

Tel: 0808 808 0123
Website: www.hearingloss.org.uk