PRINTED MATERIAL

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PRINTED MATERIAL

Printed material is one of the most commonly used forms of giving information and publicising facilities and services.

Printing should be clear and bold with lettering contrasting with the background. A 14 point size is recommended but 12 is the minumim for reasonable clarity. Some people with visual requirements will require 18 point or more. This can often be provided by enlaging photocopies from A4 to A3 size. This option should be offered IN LARGE PRINT on the basic printed sheet.

Modern graphic art makes a lot of use of lettering floating over a picture background. This is very difficult for someone with impaired vision. A plain white or yellow background with dark lettering is preferred. White lettering on a dark background is also difficult to read.

There is a tendency for a reader's eye level to droop towards the end of a line. Keeping printed lines short can help. It also helps to left justify text so that someone with a visual impairment can easily find the beginning of each new line.



HANDLING

The size, folding and binding of printed material should be considered.

How is it going to be used and carried. Is it information to read while seated or guide informaton to read while on the move? Does it need to fit into a brief case or a pocket?

It should also be considered for people with manipulation impairments, such as arthiritis. Is it easy to hold and unfold or to turn the pages?

And should there be versions in alternative formats, such as on audio tape or computer disk? People with vision impairments are increasingly using computers to read back information to them.

DYSLEXIA

Consideration needs to be given to people with dyslexia. Sometimes reducing the glare from a white background can help to assimilate the writing on a page. Material could be made available on tinted paper.

This might also be achieved by using transparent folders with a yellow or blue tint to view the printed material through.

ASK

As with all forms of disability, it is good practice to let customers and users of services know that their needs will be considered. Finding what will best assist a person with dyslexia will often result in a straightforward solution being found to make it easier for them to receive information.