NOTICES

ALARMS and WARNINGS.

NOTICES DETAILS

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NOTICES and SIGNS

Signs should inform clearly and logically. They should be large enough, contrast with their suroundings and be well lit. Lettering used should also be large enough and should be legible and contrast with its background. The words should be as short and simple as possible.

It is advisable to walk routes which are having direction signs. There should be a sign at the start and at the end and at logical changes of direction inbetween. Other signs may be needed to reassure on a long route. The wording used should not change along the route.

Consider the overall effect of notices and other displays. Too many notices could conflict. Too much additional information, such as posters, could confuse.

People with vision impairments may tend to concentrate more on hazards at low levels and may miss signs at high levels. Signs at eye level are more likely to be seen.

Tactile information at waist height may help people with visual impairments. A geometric shape, such as circle, square, triangle or star, could be used along a particular route. Raised numbers or symbols by door handles would give information about what lies behind a door. This is particularly imoportant on toilet doors.



INFORMATION BOARDS

These should be at a suitable height for all users, including wheelchair users. Horizontal or angled boards and displays can be difficult for wheelchair users and shorter people. They can also give more problems with reflections and glare.

Tactile plans and information should also be considered. The considerations and constraints of providing easy to follow plans can help in creating simple and bold information solutions which will help everyone.