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ENTRANCE AREAS

Entrances should be spacious enough for people to pause and assimilate their surroundings. Signs and directions should be obvious and clear and there should not be too many of them or of superfluous information. Any reception desk (see Furniture and Fittings) should be obvious. The area should be resonably lit to reduce the contrast between daylight outside and building lighting or daylight inside.

CORRIDORS

Corridors should be wide enough for people and wheelchair users to pass each other. 1200mm is a reasonable basic width but 1800mm would allow two wheelchair users to pass each other. A turning space of 1800mm diameter at junctions would provide a passing space and allow a wheelchair user to turn round and return in the other direction.

Lighting with colour and tonal contrasts should clearly define between wall, floor and door surfaces. Windows or lighting at the end of corridors can create glare, making vision difficult for everyone.

INTERNAL DOORS

External doors, particularly on business or public buildings, should have a clear open width of 1000mm. The clear open width of internal doors or the first opening leaf of a pair of doors should not be less than 800mm. Door closers should be adjusted so that the doors are light enough for everyone to open easily (not requiring more than 30 Newtons of opening pressure).

Where appropriate, internal doors should have vision panels at a suitable height for wheelchair users and shorter people to see and be seen.

Where doors are not automatic, 300mm clear is needed between the line of the leading edge of the door when closed and any return wall or obstacle. This is so that a wheelchair user can reach the handle and not be trapped in a room.

ROOMS

The potential use of rooms should be considered, particularly for people with impairments. There should be enough space to move around. Some furniture should not be fixed, so that space can accommodate wheelchair users. Lighting, colour and tonal contrasts should clearly define between wall, floor and door areas. This helps people with visual impairments quickly evaluate the area they have just entered.

SENSORY CONSIDERATIONS

Windows should not be behind principal speakers or presentation material as this will provide glare for everyone.

Consideration should be given to providing induction loops in meeting rooms, interview rooms and larger halls. This will help people with hearing impairments.